Photos

 

Steel Ponies

Exhibit March 10th - Aug 5th

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    1929 Indian 101 Scout Wall of Death “Drome Racer” and Crate Indian Motorcycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time Introduced in 1920, the Indian Scout featured a 37-cubic-inch V-twin engine. The low-slung Scout was an immediate hit with performance riders. In 1928, the 101 Scout was created with an even stronger frame and beefed-up engine, putting out 45 cubic inches of displacement. Considered the best bike Indian ever built, its superior handling makes it the preferred model for “Wall of Death” performers. The crate for this bike may have originally been built for a 1911 act that featured Mildred Tinkham.
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    1929 Indian 101 Scout Wall of Death “Drome Racer” and Crate Indian Motorcycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time Introduced in 1920, the Indian Scout featured a 37-cubic-inch V-twin engine. The low-slung Scout was an immediate hit with performance riders. In 1928, the 101 Scout was created with an even stronger frame and beefed-up engine, putting out 45 cubic inches of displacement. Considered the best bike Indian ever built, its superior handling makes it the preferred model for “Wall of Death” performers. The crate for this bike may have originally been built for a 1911 act that featured Mildred Tinkham.
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    1929 Indian 101 Scout Wall of Death “Drome Racer” and Crate Indian Motorcycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time Introduced in 1920, the Indian Scout featured a 37-cubic-inch V-twin engine. The low-slung Scout was an immediate hit with performance riders. In 1928, the 101 Scout was created with an even stronger frame and beefed-up engine, putting out 45 cubic inches of displacement. Considered the best bike Indian ever built, its superior handling makes it the preferred model for “Wall of Death” performers. The crate for this bike may have originally been built for a 1911 act that featured Mildred Tinkham.
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    1929 Indian 101 Scout Wall of Death “Drome Racer” and Crate Indian Motorcycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time Introduced in 1920, the Indian Scout featured a 37-cubic-inch V-twin engine. The low-slung Scout was an immediate hit with performance riders. In 1928, the 101 Scout was created with an even stronger frame and beefed-up engine, putting out 45 cubic inches of displacement. Considered the best bike Indian ever built, its superior handling makes it the preferred model for “Wall of Death” performers. The crate for this bike may have originally been built for a 1911 act that featured Mildred Tinkham.
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    1929 Indian 101 Scout Wall of Death “Drome Racer” and Crate Indian Motorcycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time Introduced in 1920, the Indian Scout featured a 37-cubic-inch V-twin engine. The low-slung Scout was an immediate hit with performance riders. In 1928, the 101 Scout was created with an even stronger frame and beefed-up engine, putting out 45 cubic inches of displacement. Considered the best bike Indian ever built, its superior handling makes it the preferred model for “Wall of Death” performers. The crate for this bike may have originally been built for a 1911 act that featured Mildred Tinkham.
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    1915 Harley-Davidson 11J Twin Three-Speed “Effie” Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Lindsey Sommer Harley-Davidson introduced a three-speed transmission in 1915. That year, Effie Hotchkiss became the first woman to ride from Brooklyn, New York to the World’s Fair in San Francisco with her mother Avis in a sidecar. In 2010, Cristine Sommer-Simmons recreated that historical ride, competing in a cross-country run beginning in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and ending 17 days later in Santa Monica, California. Cris named the bike “Effie” in honor of Effie Hotchkiss.
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    1915 Harley-Davidson 11J Twin Three-Speed “Effie” Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Lindsey Sommer Harley-Davidson introduced a three-speed transmission in 1915. That year, Effie Hotchkiss became the first woman to ride from Brooklyn, New York to the World’s Fair in San Francisco with her mother Avis in a sidecar. In 2010, Cristine Sommer-Simmons recreated that historical ride, competing in a cross-country run beginning in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and ending 17 days later in Santa Monica, California. Cris named the bike “Effie” in honor of Effie Hotchkiss.
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    1915 Harley-Davidson 11J Twin Three-Speed “Effie” Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Lindsey Sommer Harley-Davidson introduced a three-speed transmission in 1915. That year, Effie Hotchkiss became the first woman to ride from Brooklyn, New York to the World’s Fair in San Francisco with her mother Avis in a sidecar. In 2010, Cristine Sommer-Simmons recreated that historical ride, competing in a cross-country run beginning in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and ending 17 days later in Santa Monica, California. Cris named the bike “Effie” in honor of Effie Hotchkiss.
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    1915 Harley-Davidson 11J Twin Three-Speed “Effie” Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Lindsey Sommer Harley-Davidson introduced a three-speed transmission in 1915. That year, Effie Hotchkiss became the first woman to ride from Brooklyn, New York to the World’s Fair in San Francisco with her mother Avis in a sidecar. In 2010, Cristine Sommer-Simmons recreated that historical ride, competing in a cross-country run beginning in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and ending 17 days later in Santa Monica, California. Cris named the bike “Effie” in honor of Effie Hotchkiss.
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    1914 Harley-Davidson “A Motor” Board Track Racer Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time In 1914, Harley-Davidson officially entered the “racing game.” Limited quantities of racers were developed by William Ottaway, who challenged the competition with fast machines and team organization. By mid-1915, the media expounded on the performance of the “Wrecking Crew” racing team. This model is believed to be the first of only a handful of Harley-Davidsons built for the Dodge City, Kansas 300-mile road race. They lost that year, but came back to win in 1915
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    1914 Harley-Davidson “A Motor” Board Track Racer Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time In 1914, Harley-Davidson officially entered the “racing game.” Limited quantities of racers were developed by William Ottaway, who challenged the competition with fast machines and team organization. By mid-1915, the media expounded on the performance of the “Wrecking Crew” racing team. This model is believed to be the first of only a handful of Harley-Davidsons built for the Dodge City, Kansas 300-mile road race. They lost that year, but came back to win in 1915
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    1914 Harley-Davidson “A Motor” Board Track Racer Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time In 1914, Harley-Davidson officially entered the “racing game.” Limited quantities of racers were developed by William Ottaway, who challenged the competition with fast machines and team organization. By mid-1915, the media expounded on the performance of the “Wrecking Crew” racing team. This model is believed to be the first of only a handful of Harley-Davidsons built for the Dodge City, Kansas 300-mile road race. They lost that year, but came back to win in 1915
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    1914 Harley-Davidson “A Motor” Board Track Racer Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time In 1914, Harley-Davidson officially entered the “racing game.” Limited quantities of racers were developed by William Ottaway, who challenged the competition with fast machines and team organization. By mid-1915, the media expounded on the performance of the “Wrecking Crew” racing team. This model is believed to be the first of only a handful of Harley-Davidsons built for the Dodge City, Kansas 300-mile road race. They lost that year, but came back to win in 1915
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    1914 Harley-Davidson “A Motor” Board Track Racer Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time In 1914, Harley-Davidson officially entered the “racing game.” Limited quantities of racers were developed by William Ottaway, who challenged the competition with fast machines and team organization. By mid-1915, the media expounded on the performance of the “Wrecking Crew” racing team. This model is believed to be the first of only a handful of Harley-Davidsons built for the Dodge City, Kansas 300-mile road race. They lost that year, but came back to win in 1915
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    1914 Harley-Davidson “A Motor” Board Track Racer Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time In 1914, Harley-Davidson officially entered the “racing game.” Limited quantities of racers were developed by William Ottaway, who challenged the competition with fast machines and team organization. By mid-1915, the media expounded on the performance of the “Wrecking Crew” racing team. This model is believed to be the first of only a handful of Harley-Davidsons built for the Dodge City, Kansas 300-mile road race. They lost that year, but came back to win in 1915
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    1912 Pierce 4-Cylinder Pierce Cycle Company Loan: Courtesy of Alan Travis America’s first four-cylinder motorcycle was manufactured by the Pierce Cycle Company. Fast and well made, the Pierce soon had a string of city-to-city endurance race wins to its credit. A subsidiary of the Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Company, the Pierce was laid low by its cost. Priced at $325 in 1909, it cost $400 when production ceased in 1913, at which time the Ford Model T cost $525. Where is the gas tank? It is incorporated into the frame.
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    1912 Pierce 4-Cylinder Pierce Cycle Company Loan: Courtesy of Alan Travis America’s first four-cylinder motorcycle was manufactured by the Pierce Cycle Company. Fast and well made, the Pierce soon had a string of city-to-city endurance race wins to its credit. A subsidiary of the Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Company, the Pierce was laid low by its cost. Priced at $325 in 1909, it cost $400 when production ceased in 1913, at which time the Ford Model T cost $525. Where is the gas tank? It is incorporated into the frame.
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    1912 Pierce 4-Cylinder Pierce Cycle Company Loan: Courtesy of Alan Travis America’s first four-cylinder motorcycle was manufactured by the Pierce Cycle Company. Fast and well made, the Pierce soon had a string of city-to-city endurance race wins to its credit. A subsidiary of the Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Company, the Pierce was laid low by its cost. Priced at $325 in 1909, it cost $400 when production ceased in 1913, at which time the Ford Model T cost $525. Where is the gas tank? It is incorporated into the frame.
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    1908 Indian Racer Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum Erwin George “Cannon Ball” Baker rode this motorcycle to victory in one of the first races ever held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1909. Baker set his first driving record in 1914, riding coast to coast on an Indian motorcycle in 11 days. This racing model has no brakes, no front fender, a tiny rear fender, and double chain drive. By today’s standards, this racer was very much a bicycle with an engine attached.
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    1908 Indian Racer Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum Erwin George “Cannon Ball” Baker rode this motorcycle to victory in one of the first races ever held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1909. Baker set his first driving record in 1914, riding coast to coast on an Indian motorcycle in 11 days. This racing model has no brakes, no front fender, a tiny rear fender, and double chain drive. By today’s standards, this racer was very much a bicycle with an engine attached.
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    1908 Indian Racer Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum Erwin George “Cannon Ball” Baker rode this motorcycle to victory in one of the first races ever held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1909. Baker set his first driving record in 1914, riding coast to coast on an Indian motorcycle in 11 days. This racing model has no brakes, no front fender, a tiny rear fender, and double chain drive. By today’s standards, this racer was very much a bicycle with an engine attached.
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    1902 Indian Camelback Motocycle Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center. In 1901, former bicycle racers Hendee and Hedstrom teamed up to produce a motorcycle with a 1.75 bhp, single-cylinder, 4-cycle, air-cooled engine. This vehicle is one of the 143 built in 1902, the year that the model was first offered for sale. The diamond-type frame is of tubular construction, and the complete machine weighs less than 100 pounds. In 1903, chief engineer Oscar Hedstrom set the world motorcycle speed record of 56 mph.
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    1968 Harley-Davidson Captain America Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of the National Motorcycle Museum The 1969 film Easy Rider brought Harley-Davidson and motorcycling to the attention of young people all over the world. Starting with used Harleys, two bikes had their forks raked to almost 45 degrees to create the “Captain America” choppers. With its ape-hanger handlebars and heavy chrome, “Captain America” is the most widely recognized motorcycle ever made. This bike is the original from the last scene of Easy Rider.
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    1968 Harley-Davidson Captain America Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of the National Motorcycle Museum The 1969 film Easy Rider brought Harley-Davidson and motorcycling to the attention of young people all over the world. Starting with used Harleys, two bikes had their forks raked to almost 45 degrees to create the “Captain America” choppers. With its ape-hanger handlebars and heavy chrome, “Captain America” is the most widely recognized motorcycle ever made. This bike is the original from the last scene of Easy Rider.
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    1968 Harley-Davidson Captain America Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of the National Motorcycle Museum The 1969 film Easy Rider brought Harley-Davidson and motorcycling to the attention of young people all over the world. Starting with used Harleys, two bikes had their forks raked to almost 45 degrees to create the “Captain America” choppers. With its ape-hanger handlebars and heavy chrome, “Captain America” is the most widely recognized motorcycle ever made. This bike is the original from the last scene of Easy Rider.
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    1968 Harley-Davidson Captain America Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of the National Motorcycle Museum The 1969 film Easy Rider brought Harley-Davidson and motorcycling to the attention of young people all over the world. Starting with used Harleys, two bikes had their forks raked to almost 45 degrees to create the “Captain America” choppers. With its ape-hanger handlebars and heavy chrome, “Captain America” is the most widely recognized motorcycle ever made. This bike is the original from the last scene of Easy Rider.
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    1968 Harley-Davidson Captain America Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of the National Motorcycle Museum The 1969 film Easy Rider brought Harley-Davidson and motorcycling to the attention of young people all over the world. Starting with used Harleys, two bikes had their forks raked to almost 45 degrees to create the “Captain America” choppers. With its ape-hanger handlebars and heavy chrome, “Captain America” is the most widely recognized motorcycle ever made. This bike is the original from the last scene of Easy Rider.
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    1948 Indian Chief Roadmaster Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Autry National Center, Los Angeles, 97.70.1.1 Debuted in 1922, the Indian Chief was Harley-Davidson’s main competitor in the V-twin heavyweight class. Chiefs were handsome machines with trademark large skirted fenders. Although their weight hampered acceleration they could still top out at 85 mph. The cheapest trim level was the Clubman, next was the Sportsman, but if you wanted the full touring package and had the money you would choose the Roadmaster. Production of the Chief ended in 1953
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    1948 Indian Chief Roadmaster Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Autry National Center, Los Angeles, 97.70.1.1 Debuted in 1922, the Indian Chief was Harley-Davidson’s main competitor in the V-twin heavyweight class. Chiefs were handsome machines with trademark large skirted fenders. Although their weight hampered acceleration they could still top out at 85 mph. The cheapest trim level was the Clubman, next was the Sportsman, but if you wanted the full touring package and had the money you would choose the Roadmaster. Production of the Chief ended in 1953
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    1948 Indian Chief Roadmaster Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Autry National Center, Los Angeles, 97.70.1.1 Debuted in 1922, the Indian Chief was Harley-Davidson’s main competitor in the V-twin heavyweight class. Chiefs were handsome machines with trademark large skirted fenders. Although their weight hampered acceleration they could still top out at 85 mph. The cheapest trim level was the Clubman, next was the Sportsman, but if you wanted the full touring package and had the money you would choose the Roadmaster. Production of the Chief ended in 1953
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    1948 Indian Chief Roadmaster Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Autry National Center, Los Angeles, 97.70.1.1 Debuted in 1922, the Indian Chief was Harley-Davidson’s main competitor in the V-twin heavyweight class. Chiefs were handsome machines with trademark large skirted fenders. Although their weight hampered acceleration they could still top out at 85 mph. The cheapest trim level was the Clubman, next was the Sportsman, but if you wanted the full touring package and had the money you would choose the Roadmaster. Production of the Chief ended in 1953
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    1948 Indian Chief Roadmaster Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Autry National Center, Los Angeles, 97.70.1.1 Debuted in 1922, the Indian Chief was Harley-Davidson’s main competitor in the V-twin heavyweight class. Chiefs were handsome machines with trademark large skirted fenders. Although their weight hampered acceleration they could still top out at 85 mph. The cheapest trim level was the Clubman, next was the Sportsman, but if you wanted the full touring package and had the money you would choose the Roadmaster. Production of the Chief ended in 1953
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    1953 Harley-Davidson “Chino” Bobber Harley-Davidson Motor Company, customized by Carl and Matt Olsen Loan: Courtesy of Carl’s Cycle Supply A custom motorcycle that has had the front fender removed, the rear fender “bobbed,” and all superfluous parts removed to make it lighter, the bobber took shape in the 1940s and 50s. The style continues to be favored and has influenced manufacturers such as Harley-Davidson. This bobber is a recreation of the one ridden by Lee Marvin’s character, Chino, in the film The Wild One.
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    1929 Indian 101 Scout Wall of Death “Drome Racer” and Crate Indian Motorcycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Wheels Through Time Introduced in 1920, the Indian Scout featured a 37-cubic-inch V-twin engine. The low-slung Scout was an immediate hit with performance riders. In 1928, the 101 Scout was created with an even stronger frame and beefed-up engine, putting out 45 cubic inches of displacement. Considered the best bike Indian ever built, its superior handling makes it the preferred model for “Wall of Death” performers. The crate for this bike may have originally been built for a 1911 act that featured Mildred Tinkham.
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    1972 Harley-Davidson XR 750 Evel Knievel (1938-2007) Stunt Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center Evel Knievel was a daredevil from Montana. Between 1965 and 1980 he attempted over 75 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps. On May 26, 1975, Knievel crashed this bike while trying to land a jump over thirteen single-deck buses at Wembley Stadium in London. Knievel was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999.
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    1972 Harley-Davidson XR 750 Evel Knievel (1938-2007) Stunt Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center Evel Knievel was a daredevil from Montana. Between 1965 and 1980 he attempted over 75 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps. On May 26, 1975, Knievel crashed this bike while trying to land a jump over thirteen single-deck buses at Wembley Stadium in London. Knievel was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999. 1947 Knucklehead
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    1972 Harley-Davidson XR 750 Evel Knievel (1938-2007) Stunt Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center Evel Knievel was a daredevil from Montana. Between 1965 and 1980 he attempted over 75 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps. On May 26, 1975, Knievel crashed this bike while trying to land a jump over thirteen single-deck buses at Wembley Stadium in London. Knievel was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999. 1947 Knucklehead
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    1972 Harley-Davidson XR 750 Evel Knievel (1938-2007) Stunt Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center Evel Knievel was a daredevil from Montana. Between 1965 and 1980 he attempted over 75 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps. On May 26, 1975, Knievel crashed this bike while trying to land a jump over thirteen single-deck buses at Wembley Stadium in London. Knievel was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999. 1947 Knucklehead
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    1972 Harley-Davidson XR 750 Evel Knievel (1938-2007) Stunt Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center Evel Knievel was a daredevil from Montana. Between 1965 and 1980 he attempted over 75 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps. On May 26, 1975, Knievel crashed this bike while trying to land a jump over thirteen single-deck buses at Wembley Stadium in London. Knievel was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999. 1947 Knucklehead
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    1905 Harley-Davidson Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of the Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee Most Harley enthusiasts believe that Harley-Davidson built its first motorcycle in 1903, but evidence suggests that Harley-Davidson did not build the first production motorcycle until 1904 or possibly even 1905. All were single-cylinder motorcycles in reinforced bicycle frames with only rear brakes. To start the motor, riders pedaled the motorcycle up to speed like a bike. With a top speed of 25 mph, only 16 of the 1905 model were built.
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    1905 Harley-Davidson Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of the Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee Most Harley enthusiasts believe that Harley-Davidson built its first motorcycle in 1903, but evidence suggests that Harley-Davidson did not build the first production motorcycle until 1904 or possibly even 1905. All were single-cylinder motorcycles in reinforced bicycle frames with only rear brakes. To start the motor, riders pedaled the motorcycle up to speed like a bike. With a top speed of 25 mph, only 16 of the 1905 model were built.
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    1936 Harley-Davidson EL 1005 Knucklehead Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Doug Brown The year 1936 began production of the “Model E,” nicknamed the “Knucklehead” due to the knuckle shape of its engine valve covers. Number 6 off the line, this is the oldest running Knucklehead in America thanks to Carl and Matt Olsen who took 5 years to restore it. The last of the Knuckleheads was produced by Harley-Davidson in 1947.
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    1936 Harley-Davidson EL 1005 Knucklehead Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Doug Brown The year 1936 began production of the “Model E,” nicknamed the “Knucklehead” due to the knuckle shape of its engine valve covers. Number 6 off the line, this is the oldest running Knucklehead in America thanks to Carl and Matt Olsen who took 5 years to restore it. The last of the Knuckleheads was produced by Harley-Davidson in 1947.
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    1936 Harley-Davidson EL 1005 Knucklehead Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Doug Brown The year 1936 began production of the “Model E,” nicknamed the “Knucklehead” due to the knuckle shape of its engine valve covers. Number 6 off the line, this is the oldest running Knucklehead in America thanks to Carl and Matt Olsen who took 5 years to restore it. The last of the Knuckleheads was produced by Harley-Davidson in 1947.
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    1936 Harley-Davidson EL 1005 Knucklehead Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Doug Brown The year 1936 began production of the “Model E,” nicknamed the “Knucklehead” due to the knuckle shape of its engine valve covers. Number 6 off the line, this is the oldest running Knucklehead in America thanks to Carl and Matt Olsen who took 5 years to restore it. The last of the Knuckleheads was produced by Harley-Davidson in 1947.
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    1916 Indian Powerplus Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos In 1916, Indian introduced its famous 61-cubic-inch, flathead V-twin Powerplus engine, with a three-speed transmission, foot-operated clutch, and chain drive. In 1916, sisters Adeline and Augusta Van Buren became the first women to cross the United States on a pair of Indian Powerplus motorcycles. When the United States entered World War I, almost the entire production of Powerplus motorcycles was turned over to the military. The Powerplus continued in production until 1924.
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    1916 Indian Powerplus Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos In 1916, Indian introduced its famous 61-cubic-inch, flathead V-twin Powerplus engine, with a three-speed transmission, foot-operated clutch, and chain drive. In 1916, sisters Adeline and Augusta Van Buren became the first women to cross the United States on a pair of Indian Powerplus motorcycles. When the United States entered World War I, almost the entire production of Powerplus motorcycles was turned over to the military. The Powerplus continued in production until 1924.
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    1916 Indian Powerplus Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos In 1916, Indian introduced its famous 61-cubic-inch, flathead V-twin Powerplus engine, with a three-speed transmission, foot-operated clutch, and chain drive. In 1916, sisters Adeline and Augusta Van Buren became the first women to cross the United States on a pair of Indian Powerplus motorcycles. When the United States entered World War I, almost the entire production of Powerplus motorcycles was turned over to the military. The Powerplus continued in production until 1924.
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    1916 Indian Powerplus Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos In 1916, Indian introduced its famous 61-cubic-inch, flathead V-twin Powerplus engine, with a three-speed transmission, foot-operated clutch, and chain drive. In 1916, sisters Adeline and Augusta Van Buren became the first women to cross the United States on a pair of Indian Powerplus motorcycles. When the United States entered World War I, almost the entire production of Powerplus motorcycles was turned over to the military. The Powerplus continued in production until 1924.
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    1916 Indian Powerplus Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos In 1916, Indian introduced its famous 61-cubic-inch, flathead V-twin Powerplus engine, with a three-speed transmission, foot-operated clutch, and chain drive. In 1916, sisters Adeline and Augusta Van Buren became the first women to cross the United States on a pair of Indian Powerplus motorcycles. When the United States entered World War I, almost the entire production of Powerplus motorcycles was turned over to the military. The Powerplus continued in production until 1924.
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    1916 Indian Powerplus Hendee Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos In 1916, Indian introduced its famous 61-cubic-inch, flathead V-twin Powerplus engine, with a three-speed transmission, foot-operated clutch, and chain drive. In 1916, sisters Adeline and Augusta Van Buren became the first women to cross the United States on a pair of Indian Powerplus motorcycles. When the United States entered World War I, almost the entire production of Powerplus motorcycles was turned over to the military. The Powerplus continued in production until 1924.
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    1915 Harley-Davidson 11J Twin Three-Speed “Effie” Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Lindsey Sommer Harley-Davidson introduced a three-speed transmission in 1915. That year, Effie Hotchkiss became the first woman to ride from Brooklyn, New York to the World’s Fair in San Francisco with her mother Avis in a sidecar. In 2010, Cristine Sommer-Simmons recreated that historical ride, competing in a cross-country run beginning in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and ending 17 days later in Santa Monica, California. Cris named the bike “Effie” in honor of Effie Hotchkiss.
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    1915 Harley-Davidson 11J Twin Three-Speed “Effie” Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Lindsey Sommer Harley-Davidson introduced a three-speed transmission in 1915. That year, Effie Hotchkiss became the first woman to ride from Brooklyn, New York to the World’s Fair in San Francisco with her mother Avis in a sidecar. In 2010, Cristine Sommer-Simmons recreated that historical ride, competing in a cross-country run beginning in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and ending 17 days later in Santa Monica, California. Cris named the bike “Effie” in honor of Effie Hotchkiss.
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    1915 Harley-Davidson 11J Twin Three-Speed “Effie” Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Lindsey Sommer Harley-Davidson introduced a three-speed transmission in 1915. That year, Effie Hotchkiss became the first woman to ride from Brooklyn, New York to the World’s Fair in San Francisco with her mother Avis in a sidecar. In 2010, Cristine Sommer-Simmons recreated that historical ride, competing in a cross-country run beginning in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and ending 17 days later in Santa Monica, California. Cris named the bike “Effie” in honor of Effie Hotchkiss.
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    1915 Harley-Davidson 11J Twin Three-Speed “Effie” Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Lindsey Sommer Harley-Davidson introduced a three-speed transmission in 1915. That year, Effie Hotchkiss became the first woman to ride from Brooklyn, New York to the World’s Fair in San Francisco with her mother Avis in a sidecar. In 2010, Cristine Sommer-Simmons recreated that historical ride, competing in a cross-country run beginning in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and ending 17 days later in Santa Monica, California. Cris named the bike “Effie” in honor of Effie Hotchkiss.
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    1929 Harley-Davidson Model JDH with Double Wide Sidecar Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Indianapolis Southside Harley-Davidson The JDH, known as the Two-Cam Harley, was advertised as the “fastest model ever,” with a top speed of 85 to 100 mph. It was the first Harley-Davidson with the appearance of a modern motorcycle featuring larger fenders and gas tank. New for 1929 were twin headlights. In 1929, 10,000 74 cubic inch JDs were produced, yet probably less than 100 of these very special H models were ever built.
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    1929 Harley-Davidson Model JDH with Double Wide Sidecar Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Indianapolis Southside Harley-Davidson The JDH, known as the Two-Cam Harley, was advertised as the “fastest model ever,” with a top speed of 85 to 100 mph. It was the first Harley-Davidson with the appearance of a modern motorcycle featuring larger fenders and gas tank. New for 1929 were twin headlights. In 1929, 10,000 74 cubic inch JDs were produced, yet probably less than 100 of these very special H models were ever built.
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    1929 Harley-Davidson Model JDH with Double Wide Sidecar Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Indianapolis Southside Harley-Davidson The JDH, known as the Two-Cam Harley, was advertised as the “fastest model ever,” with a top speed of 85 to 100 mph. It was the first Harley-Davidson with the appearance of a modern motorcycle featuring larger fenders and gas tank. New for 1929 were twin headlights. In 1929, 10,000 74 cubic inch JDs were produced, yet probably less than 100 of these very special H models were ever built.
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    1929 Harley-Davidson Model JDH with Double Wide Sidecar Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Indianapolis Southside Harley-Davidson The JDH, known as the Two-Cam Harley, was advertised as the “fastest model ever,” with a top speed of 85 to 100 mph. It was the first Harley-Davidson with the appearance of a modern motorcycle featuring larger fenders and gas tank. New for 1929 were twin headlights. In 1929, 10,000 74 cubic inch JDs were produced, yet probably less than 100 of these very special H models were ever built.
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    1929 Harley-Davidson Model JDH with Double Wide Sidecar Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Indianapolis Southside Harley-Davidson The JDH, known as the Two-Cam Harley, was advertised as the “fastest model ever,” with a top speed of 85 to 100 mph. It was the first Harley-Davidson with the appearance of a modern motorcycle featuring larger fenders and gas tank. New for 1929 were twin headlights. In 1929, 10,000 74 cubic inch JDs were produced, yet probably less than 100 of these very special H models were ever built.
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    1929 Harley-Davidson Model JDH with Double Wide Sidecar Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Indianapolis Southside Harley-Davidson The JDH, known as the Two-Cam Harley, was advertised as the “fastest model ever,” with a top speed of 85 to 100 mph. It was the first Harley-Davidson with the appearance of a modern motorcycle featuring larger fenders and gas tank. New for 1929 were twin headlights. In 1929, 10,000 74 cubic inch JDs were produced, yet probably less than 100 of these very special H models were ever built.
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    1942 Indian Four Police Model Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos This model began in 1927 when Indian purchased the Ace Four, created by W.G. Henderson. For the first year or so the bike was called the “Indian Ace.” Police favored the Indian Four for traffic patrol because they were faster than anything on the roads. 1942 was the last year of production for the Indian Four.
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    1942 Indian Four Police Model Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos This model began in 1927 when Indian purchased the Ace Four, created by W.G. Henderson. For the first year or so the bike was called the “Indian Ace.” Police favored the Indian Four for traffic patrol because they were faster than anything on the roads. 1942 was the last year of production for the Indian Four.
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    1942 Indian Four Police Model Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company Loan: Courtesy of Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Springfield, Massachusetts, Gift of Esta K. Manthos This model began in 1927 when Indian purchased the Ace Four, created by W.G. Henderson. For the first year or so the bike was called the “Indian Ace.” Police favored the Indian Four for traffic patrol because they were faster than anything on the roads. 1942 was the last year of production for the Indian Four.
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    2006 Custom Art Attack Russ Hess, Cowboy Customs Loan: Courtesy of Russ Hess, Cowboy Customs Bikes The imagery of the West inspired master builder Russ Hess to come out of retirement and create Art Attack. “It had been 31 years from the last bike I built in 1976, an old Shovelhead, to the bike I built in 2006, Art Attack,” said Russ. Taking 800 hours to build, the unique Western styling of this virtual saddle on wheels is achieved with 47 pieces of engraved silver overlay and 115 gold flowers and rubies.
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    2006 Custom Art Attack Russ Hess, Cowboy Customs Loan: Courtesy of Russ Hess, Cowboy Customs Bikes The imagery of the West inspired master builder Russ Hess to come out of retirement and create Art Attack. “It had been 31 years from the last bike I built in 1976, an old Shovelhead, to the bike I built in 2006, Art Attack,” said Russ. Taking 800 hours to build, the unique Western styling of this virtual saddle on wheels is achieved with 47 pieces of engraved silver overlay and 115 gold flowers and rubies.
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    Photo opportunity bike with sidecar. Courtesy of LA Cycles, Whitestown, IN.
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    1947 Knucklehead Custom Untouchable Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Arlen Ness Loan: Courtesy of Arlen Ness Arlen Ness is an American entrepreneur and motorcyclist internationally recognized as a master builder of customized choppers. His first customs were made in the garage of his home in San Leandro, California. This 1947 knucklehead was his first “serious” bike which he worked on from 1963 until its present form. Arlen has received recognition and awards including Builder of the Year and induction into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.
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    1947 Knucklehead Custom Untouchable Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Arlen Ness Loan: Courtesy of Arlen Ness Arlen Ness is an American entrepreneur and motorcyclist internationally recognized as a master builder of customized choppers. His first customs were made in the garage of his home in San Leandro, California. This 1947 knucklehead was his first “serious” bike which he worked on from 1963 until its present form. Arlen has received recognition and awards including Builder of the Year and induction into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.
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    1947 Knucklehead Custom Untouchable Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Arlen Ness Loan: Courtesy of Arlen Ness Arlen Ness is an American entrepreneur and motorcyclist internationally recognized as a master builder of customized choppers. His first customs were made in the garage of his home in San Leandro, California. This 1947 knucklehead was his first “serious” bike which he worked on from 1963 until its present form. Arlen has received recognition and awards including Builder of the Year and induction into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.
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    1947 Knucklehead Custom Untouchable Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Arlen Ness Loan: Courtesy of Arlen Ness Arlen Ness is an American entrepreneur and motorcyclist internationally recognized as a master builder of customized choppers. His first customs were made in the garage of his home in San Leandro, California. This 1947 knucklehead was his first “serious” bike which he worked on from 1963 until its present form. Arlen has received recognition and awards including Builder of the Year and induction into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.
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    1947 Knucklehead Custom Untouchable Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Arlen Ness Loan: Courtesy of Arlen Ness Arlen Ness is an American entrepreneur and motorcyclist internationally recognized as a master builder of customized choppers. His first customs were made in the garage of his home in San Leandro, California. This 1947 knucklehead was his first “serious” bike which he worked on from 1963 until its present form. Arlen has received recognition and awards including Builder of the Year and induction into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.
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    2006 Custom Art Attack Russ Hess, Cowboy Customs Loan: Courtesy of Russ Hess, Cowboy Customs Bikes The imagery of the West inspired master builder Russ Hess to come out of retirement and create Art Attack. “It had been 31 years from the last bike I built in 1976, an old Shovelhead, to the bike I built in 2006, Art Attack,” said Russ. Taking 800 hours to build, the unique Western styling of this virtual saddle on wheels is achieved with 47 pieces of engraved silver overlay and 115 gold flowers and rubies.
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    2006 Custom Art Attack Russ Hess, Cowboy Customs Loan: Courtesy of Russ Hess, Cowboy Customs Bikes The imagery of the West inspired master builder Russ Hess to come out of retirement and create Art Attack. “It had been 31 years from the last bike I built in 1976, an old Shovelhead, to the bike I built in 2006, Art Attack,” said Russ. Taking 800 hours to build, the unique Western styling of this virtual saddle on wheels is achieved with 47 pieces of engraved silver overlay and 115 gold flowers and rubies.
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    2009 Custom Saginaw Chippewa Paul Teutul, Sr., Orange County Choppers Loan: Courtesy of the Saginaw Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan This motorcycle can be seen on the television series American Chopper. The designers worked with Shannon Martin, Director of the Ziibiwing Center. “We helped them to learn about the symbolism and showed them things that could be used for design elements,” Martin said. Photo
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    2009 Custom Saginaw Chippewa Paul Teutul, Sr., Orange County Choppers Loan: Courtesy of the Saginaw Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan This motorcycle can be seen on the television series American Chopper. The designers worked with Shannon Martin, Director of the Ziibiwing Center. “We helped them to learn about the symbolism and showed them things that could be used for design elements,” Martin said. Photo
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    2009 Custom Saginaw Chippewa Paul Teutul, Sr., Orange County Choppers Loan: Courtesy of the Saginaw Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan This motorcycle can be seen on the television series American Chopper. The designers worked with Shannon Martin, Director of the Ziibiwing Center. “We helped them to learn about the symbolism and showed them things that could be used for design elements,” Martin said. Photo
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    2009 Custom Saginaw Chippewa Paul Teutul, Sr., Orange County Choppers Loan: Courtesy of the Saginaw Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan This motorcycle can be seen on the television series American Chopper. The designers worked with Shannon Martin, Director of the Ziibiwing Center. “We helped them to learn about the symbolism and showed them things that could be used for design elements,” Martin said. Photo
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    2010 Custom Great Spirit Troy Vargas, Lakota Choppers Loan: Courtesy of Troy Vargas (Lakota Sioux) Troy (Mohta Topa) runs Lakota Choppers, taking great pride in his heritage. His talents can be seen in the sixteen bikes he has built. Sharing his vision of the Great Spirit (Wankan Tanka) through a V-twin engine, hide, wood, and stone are a few of the materials used for this creation. Built in 25 days, Great Spirit is road worthy and ready for travel.
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    2010 Custom Great Spirit Troy Vargas, Lakota Choppers Loan: Courtesy of Troy Vargas (Lakota Sioux) Troy (Mohta Topa) runs Lakota Choppers, taking great pride in his heritage. His talents can be seen in the sixteen bikes he has built. Sharing his vision of the Great Spirit (Wankan Tanka) through a V-twin engine, hide, wood, and stone are a few of the materials used for this creation. Built in 25 days, Great Spirit is road worthy and ready for travel.
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    2010 Custom Great Spirit Troy Vargas, Lakota Choppers Loan: Courtesy of Troy Vargas (Lakota Sioux) Troy (Mohta Topa) runs Lakota Choppers, taking great pride in his heritage. His talents can be seen in the sixteen bikes he has built. Sharing his vision of the Great Spirit (Wankan Tanka) through a V-twin engine, hide, wood, and stone are a few of the materials used for this creation. Built in 25 days, Great Spirit is road worthy and ready for travel.
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    2010 Custom Great Spirit Troy Vargas, Lakota Choppers Loan: Courtesy of Troy Vargas (Lakota Sioux) Troy (Mohta Topa) runs Lakota Choppers, taking great pride in his heritage. His talents can be seen in the sixteen bikes he has built. Sharing his vision of the Great Spirit (Wankan Tanka) through a V-twin engine, hide, wood, and stone are a few of the materials used for this creation. Built in 25 days, Great Spirit is road worthy and ready for travel.
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    2010 Custom Great Spirit Troy Vargas, Lakota Choppers Loan: Courtesy of Troy Vargas (Lakota Sioux) Troy (Mohta Topa) runs Lakota Choppers, taking great pride in his heritage. His talents can be seen in the sixteen bikes he has built. Sharing his vision of the Great Spirit (Wankan Tanka) through a V-twin engine, hide, wood, and stone are a few of the materials used for this creation. Built in 25 days, Great Spirit is road worthy and ready for travel.
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    1998 Harley-Davidson Road King Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Northern Cheyenne) In 1992, Ben Nighthorse Campbell of Colorado became the first Native American to serve in the U.S. Senate in more than sixty years. A member of the Northern Cheyenne tribe, Campbell is an avid motorcycle rider and enthusiast inducted to the Motorcycle Museum’s Hall of Fame in 2001 for his efforts fighting for motorcyclist rights on the national level. In 1993, he became the original founder of the Four Corners Iron Horse Motorcycle Rally.
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    1998 Harley-Davidson Road King Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Northern Cheyenne) In 1992, Ben Nighthorse Campbell of Colorado became the first Native American to serve in the U.S. Senate in more than sixty years. A member of the Northern Cheyenne tribe, Campbell is an avid motorcycle rider and enthusiast inducted to the Motorcycle Museum’s Hall of Fame in 2001 for his efforts fighting for motorcyclist rights on the national level. In 1993, he became the original founder of the Four Corners Iron Horse Motorcycle Rally.
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    1998 Harley-Davidson Road King Harley-Davidson Motor Company Loan: Courtesy of Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Northern Cheyenne) In 1992, Ben Nighthorse Campbell of Colorado became the first Native American to serve in the U.S. Senate in more than sixty years. A member of the Northern Cheyenne tribe, Campbell is an avid motorcycle rider and enthusiast inducted to the Motorcycle Museum’s Hall of Fame in 2001 for his efforts fighting for motorcyclist rights on the national level. In 1993, he became the original founder of the Four Corners Iron Horse Motorcycle Rally.
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    1950 Harley-Davidson TEX Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company, customized by Mil Blair Loan: Courtesy of Mil Blair Mil Blair was eleven years old when he first saw the “Tex” Keeler motorcycle on the cover of Saturday Evening Post. A premier bike builder, two hundred bikes later Mil finally tackled “Tex.” “The bike has been in the back of my mind since the day I saw the painting,” said Mil. He has ridden this bike to Sturgis on more than one occasion. 1953
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    1950 Harley-Davidson TEX Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company, customized by Mil Blair Loan: Courtesy of Mil Blair Mil Blair was eleven years old when he first saw the “Tex” Keeler motorcycle on the cover of Saturday Evening Post. A premier bike builder, two hundred bikes later Mil finally tackled “Tex.” “The bike has been in the back of my mind since the day I saw the painting,” said Mil. He has ridden this bike to Sturgis on more than one occasion. 1953
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    1950 Harley-Davidson TEX Bike Harley-Davidson Motor Company, customized by Mil Blair Loan: Courtesy of Mil Blair Mil Blair was eleven years old when he first saw the “Tex” Keeler motorcycle on the cover of Saturday Evening Post. A premier bike builder, two hundred bikes later Mil finally tackled “Tex.” “The bike has been in the back of my mind since the day I saw the painting,” said Mil. He has ridden this bike to Sturgis on more than one occasion. 1953
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